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Homemade BBQ sauce

This recipe makes 6 servings

378 calories per serving

The origins of barbecue sauce go back many centuries and are linked to the history of American cuisine. The roots of barbecue sauce go back to the culinary traditions of Native Americans and European settlers, which have merged over time.

Preparation

10 Minutes

Cooking

0 Minutes

Total

10 Minutes

Pot of homemade tomato sauce on wooden table.

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Ingredients

  • 1 cup Ketchup
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup
  • 1 teaspoon Molasses
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • 1 teaspoon Chili
  • 1 teaspoon white vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon Onion powder
  • 1 teaspoon liquid smoke

Preparation

Step 1 - Mix the ingredients

*Liquid smoke, if you want a smokier flavour from your bbq sauce.

In conclusion,

Native Americans were already using fruit- and berry-based sauces to accompany their grilled meats. European settlers also brought their own cooking and meat preparation techniques, including smoking and slow cooking, which influenced the development of barbecue sauce.

When European settlers arrived in North America, they quickly adopted Native American barbecuing methods, and over time the two cultures fused their culinary practices. This gave rise to various variations of barbecue sauces across the United States, each with its own characteristic ingredients and flavors.

For example, in North Carolina, traditional barbecue sauce is often vinegar-based, and is often used to drizzle over grilled pork. In Kansas, on the other hand, barbecue sauce is thicker, sweeter, and tomato-based, accompanying mainly ribs. Texas also has its own version, which focuses on beef and uses a spicier, chili-based sauce.

It's important to note that the precise origin of barbecue sauce is difficult to determine, as it has evolved over time, influenced by different cultures and regions. Nevertheless, its development is closely linked to America's culinary history and remains an emblematic part of American cuisine.

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